10 ways to ease electricity (load shedding) problems for your business

This coming winter if you are in Nepal, ease your electricity problems (load shedding) in your company with the following tips:

  1. buy laptops (and LCD/LED monitors) or power saver computers (ask for computers with Intel Atom processors -cheaper too)
  2. buy offline UPS that have extended backups with inverter batteries. Check if solar power enabled UPS serves your needs (could be cost-effective if you are in a long haul –more than 5 years – it requires substantial initial investment). I have bought one from Gham pani. Others that I know of are Gham Power and Solar Solutions.
  3. Use Gas powered room heaters (and even for bathing now).
  4. Have meetings out in your garden. In this age of technology, we forget we can make this happen in the warm sun, without relying on rooms with electricity and AC’s and more!
  5. Make sure the electricity meters in your business has more than 30 to 60 Ampere at least so that it can handle heavy duty electrical items. You do not need a three phase line unless you are more than 50 people big or use more than 2 or 3 heavy duty electrical appliances at all time.
  6. Do install light saver bulbs instead of the traditional electricity guzzling bulbs. A must!
  7. Make a deal with a business in another load-shedding sector to share space when lights go off and your back up runs out. Many service provider business might like this option.
  8. Get a diesel generator (instead of petrol which is more expensive) and get a storage drum and store enough diesel supply to get out of gasoline supply problems. (This happens regularly in Kathmandu).
  9. Stay in a place which is between 2 load-shedding sector. i.e you make sure you can use electricity from another sector when the other sector is under load shedding. You will need the permission of the local electricity authority, Its worth a try if you have your office in such a select area. Specially for IT companies who need 24 hour access).
  10. Go outside Kathmandu and urban centers. A lot of small towns in Nepal have their own micro-hydro power stations which are outside the national grid and are quite self sufficient for small business. Think village !

I know this is a long list to worry about, but electricity problem is not to be brushed aside if you want to do any serious business in Kathmandu.

Add your own suggestions below !

Comments

  1. I like those options that tell me to rely more on alternate energy and energy savers because it is also a solution to the national woe of energy crisis. However, I would not advocate the ‘illegal’ one or any that solves the problem just for the business but worsens it for the community (storage tanks secured by Big Cheeses, gas-powered bathing instead of solar-powered et al)